Match these key terms to correct definitions. 

Match these key terms to correct definitions. 

Match these key terms to correct definitions. 

Raglan's order was [[badly]] written. It told cavalry commander Lord Lucan "to go quickly to the front...& try to stop the enemy carrying away the guns". The order was [[delivered]] by Captain Nolan and Lucan asked Nolan what it exactly meant. Nolan impatiently painted down the valley and replied: 

"There my lord is your enemy; there are your [[guns]]. 

This poem is about [[courage]] not about the bad luck or stupidity that put the men of the Light Brigade cavalry in a position to show that courage. 

[[Tennyson]] wrote "The Charge of the Light Brigade" in a few minutes on December 2, 1854. He had read an article in the London Times about the Battle of Balaclava in the [[Crimean]] War, which was fought from 1853 to 1856.

On 25 October 1854 Lord Raglan decided to attack the [[Russians]]. He sent an order but it was fatally misinterpreted, and 673 Light Brigade cavalrymen were sent charging down the [[valley]] with Russian guns all around. Between 100 and 200 soldiers are thought to have [[died]]